Lyme disease, other pest-born diseases increase in Ohio & nationwide

Outdoor workers should always follow proper safety practices to avoid insect bites, but even more so as disease cases have increased rapidly during the last decade.

In Ohio, SCT’s home state, Lyme Disease cases increased from 45 human cases in 2008 to 270 cases in 2017, according to a Cleveland.com report. Lyme Disease, which can be spread by blacklegged ticks, causes muscle stiffness, extreme fatigue and joint pain.

An additional report from the Centers from Disease Control found that Ohio reported 1,358 disease cases from ticks from 2004 to 2016. Nationwide, diseases from  mosquitoes, ticks and fleas have tripled in the past 13 years, with more than 96,000 cases in 2016.

Source: CDC

If you find a tick that is attached to your skin, it’s important to remove it as quickly as possible to limit the chance for disease to transmit.

The CDC gives a quick set of instructions for how to quickly remove a tick.

  • Use tweezers to grab the tick as close to the skin’s surface as possible
  • Pull upward with steady, even pressure. Do not twist the tick, which can cause the mouth of the insect to break off and remain attached to the skin.
  • After removing the tick, thoroughly clean the bite area and your hands with rubbing alcohol or soap and water.
  • Never crush a tick with your fingers. Dispose of a live tick by putting it in alcohol, placing it in a sealed container, or flushing it down the toilet.

As the weather improves and more workers head outdoors, it’s important to be aware of the potential hazards that workers can face. Whether it’s wildlife, extreme heat, or severe weather, our Outdoor Working Hazards video series is a great resource. Feel free to use the video playlist below as part of a Toolbox Talk or training session.

ABCs of Safety: L is for Ladders

During this week’s National Safety Stand-Down, we have a timely edition of the ABCs of Safety video series.

Ladders are one of the most commonly used tools in various workplaces, but many people still tend to use them in dangerous ways. Check out our video below to learn some of the most common ladder mistakes that can lead to falls, injuries, or even death.

Need to spruce up your company’s OSHA safety compliance plan? Contact our workplace safety experts today at 1-800-204-1729 or complete the contact form below.








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Study finds link between noise exposure and high blood pressure, cholesterol

A recent study from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health found that workers subject to excessive noise exposure  have an increased risk for high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

According to Safety and Health Magazine, researchers at NIOSH reviewed data from more than 20,000 workers using the 2014 National Health Interview Survey and found a link between noise exposure at work and elevated levels of hypertension and cholesterol.

In the study, 25 percent of workers had a history of noise exposure on the job. Loud noise impacts about 22 million workers in the United States. Furthermore, the study found that occupational noise contributed to 58 percent of hearing damage cases, 14 percent of hypertension cases, and nine percent of elevated cholesterol cases.

Additionally, jobs that most often had occupational noise exposure were production at 55 percent, construction and extraction at 54 percent, and installation, maintenance and repair at 54 percent.

“If noise could be reduced to safer levels in the workplace, more than 5 million cases of hearing difficulty among noise-exposed workers could potentially be prevented,” said study co-author Liz Masterson, Ph.D.

Below, view our quick and informative video to learn some ways to easily protect the hearing of everyone in your workplace.

And while you’re here, be sure to visit SCT Supply. At our safety supply store, you can find thousands of products from dozens of the top brands in the safety industry, including various types of hearing protection equipment.

ABCs of Safety: J is for JSA

Another week means another fun and informative ABCs of Safety video from the workplace safety experts at SCT. Our latest entry covers JSA, which stands for job safety analysis. Some also call it a JHA, or a job hazard analysis.

Performing a JSA at your workplace is one of the best and most effective ways to prevent occupational illnesses, injuries, and fatalities.

Missed any of our previous ABCs of Safety videos? You can watch them all in one handy playlist below.

Want the advice of SCT’s safety experts about your current JSA procedures? Drop us a note through our Contact Us page, and one of our safety representatives will contact you directly!

ABCs of Safety: I is for Incident Investigation

Nobody wants a near miss or severe injury to occur at their workplace, but an important piece of a successful safety program is examining why these events occur.

In this week’s ABCs of Safety video, we highlight the importance of a thorough Incident Investigation. Because the vast majority of workplace injuries and deaths are preventable, investigating past occurrences is a major key in preventing future incidents from happening.

Not sure how to conduct an incident investigation of your own? Contact the safety experts at SCT, whose decades of OSHA experience make them the best in the business. Call us at 1-800-204-1729 or fill out the contact form below.








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ABCs of Safety: H is for Hazard Communication

This week, we’re covering OSHA’s second most cited violation: hazard communication. While the HAZCOM system aligned with the Globally Harmonized System more than a year ago, OSHA’s statistics prove that many companies are still not properly adhering to the standard.

Properly labelling and handling chemicals can be the difference between life and death in the workplace. Watch our latest edition of the ABCs of Safety to make sure your HAZCOM practices are where they need to be.

Our team of experts can raise the bar of your workplace safety plan. Contact us today at 1-800-204-1729 or complete the contact form below.








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National Safety Stand-Down set for May 7-11, 2018

This year’s National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls in Construction is set for May 7-11, 2018.

The Safety Stand-Down is an annual effort where the workplace safety industry comes together to focus on preventing falls, which account for more than a third of construction fatalities and are the leading cause of death among construction workers, according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

Fall protection also routinely tops OSHA’s list of the Top 10 Most Cited Violations. 

Anyone who wants to prevent fall hazards in the workplace is encouraged to participate in the Stand-Down and there are no requirements for what occurs at a Stand-Down. It can be as simple as hosting a safety toolbox talk, taking extra time to inspect safety equipment, or anything that meets the specific needs at your workplace.

If you need to brush up on your fall protection knowledge, watch our Focus on Fall Protection series below. Feel free to use the videos as a part of your own National Safety Stand-Down event!

ABCs of Safety: F is for Fall Protection

Fall protection has topped OSHA’s list of most cited violations for a number of years, and it does not seem like that will change any time soon.

Watch our latest edition of the ABCs of Safety to learn how to eliminate one of the most dangerous hazards from your workplace.

ABCs of Safety: D is for Drug Free

We’re back with our latest edition of the ABCs of Safety. This week, we’re highlighting the benefits of a drug free workplace, which can increase the productivity and safety of almost any work environment.

Check out our video below for the full story. Join us next week as SCT Director of Construction Services Dennis Hobart reveals the topic for the letter E.

Looking to develop a Drug Free Workplace at your business? Contact the occupational health experts at SCT, led by company founder and president Gail Grueser. Call us at 1-800-204-1729 or complete the contact form below.








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ABCs of Safety: C is for Competent Person

“C is for Competent Person” is the third installment of our ABCs of Safety video series. We’re getting back to basics and delving deep in to the guiding principles of occupational safety and health.

Per OSHA’s definition, a “Competent Person” is someone who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards, and who has the authority to take swift corrective measures to remove said hazards.

Check out our “C is for Competent Person” video below to learn the duties of a competent person on a worksite.

OSHA’s “Competent Person” Definition, word-for-word:

“A person who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous or dangerous to employees, and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them.”

Designating a competent person on your team is an important aspect of having a well-functioning safety program. Here are some questions to consider when deciding on identifying a competent person:

  • How much field experience does this person have conducting the necessary work?
  • Has this person received training in the needed area of work, and any related subjects?
  • Does this person have experience with supervision?

The safety experts at SCT can help you identify your competent person needs, and train employees to become identified competent persons on their worksites. Contact us today through the form below!








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