Hidden Economics of Drugs in the Workplace (Infographic)

Though the health effects of drugs are devastating, the economic impact of drugs can also prove harmful.

Setting aside the emotional and physical tolls that drugs have on a user, the abuse of drugs–both legal and illicit–have serious financial repercussions in business. Costs associated with drugs–usually related to crime, loss of productivity, absenteeism, and health care–account for about $700 billion annually, according to results from the National Survey on Drug Use & Health.

We’ve created an infographic that highlights the overall costs of substance abuse in the workplace, breaking it down into costs associated with alcohol ($224 billion/year), tobacco ($295 billion/year), and illicit drugs ($193 billion/year).

Additionally, the infographic depicts the industries that see the highest rates of substance use and abuse, including general construction, mining, general manufacturing, transportation and warehouses, and hospitality and food service.

Check out the National Drug-Free Workplace Alliance website for more information and statistics regarding the impact of drugs in the workplace.

To talk to an Occupational Safety and Health expert about crafting a Drug Free Program or Policy for your workplace, contact SCT at 1-800-204-1729, or contact us via the electronic form below.








captcha

 

OSHA Top 10 Violations for 2017 Released

At last week’s National Safety Council Congress and Expo in Indianapolis, the NSC released the preliminary OSHA Top 10 Violations list for the 2017 fiscal year.  The data includes violations through Sept. 4.

Once again, general fall protection requirements topped the list with more than 6,000 citations, almost 2,000 more than second-place hazard communication. The top five remained unchanged from 2016, with ladders moving up to sixth and powered industrial trucks falling to one spot to seventh.

Fall protection training is a new entry in the 2017 list, taking 9th place with 1,523 citations. General electrical requirements fell out of the top 10.

The full list according to the NSC:

  • Fall Protection; General Requirements (1926.501) – 6,072
  • Hazard Communication (1910.1200) – 4,176
  • Scaffolding (1926.451) – 3,288
  • Respiratory Protection (1910.134) –  3,097
  • Lockout/Tagout (1910.147) –  2,877
  • Ladders (1926.1053) – 2,241
  • Powered Industrial Trucks (1910.178) – 2,162
  • Machine Guarding (1910.212) – 1,933
  • Fall Protection – Training Requirements (1926.503) – 1,523
  • Electrical – Wiring Methods (1910.305) – 1,405

“The OSHA Top 10 is more than just a list, it is a blueprint for keeping workers safe,” said NSC President and CEO Deborah A.P. Hersman in a news release. “When we all work together to address hazards, we can do the best job possible to ensure employees go home safely each day.”

The finalized data is set to be released in December 2017.

At SCT, we can help your company identify and eliminate all of these hazards. Whether it’s through on-site workplace audits, complete safety program development, or refresher training for employees and supervisors, our team of experts will help you reach your safety goals.

Contact us today online or call us at 1-800-204-1729.

While you’re here, check out our video below that covers OSHA’s Top 10 Citations from FY2016. Subscribe to our YouTube Channel or Like us on Facebook so you never miss a new video from us.

OSHA construction silica enforcement is SATURDAY!

Heads up construction companies, OSHA’s silica enforcement starts on Saturday, September 23, 2017!

SCT’s staff of occupational safety and health experts has the training and skills to help your company transition into this new standard.

During his time working for OSHA, Mr. Bielema helped develop the new silica standard. Mr. Bielema’s most recent position with OSHA was as Area Director for the Peoria, IL, office. The new rule went into effect in June 2016, but the enforcement date was delayed to allow for companies to align their programs and policies with the new standard and conduct necessary updated training.

Mr. Bielema has developed a brand new training course for SCT that will bring you and your employees up to speed on the new regulations. Watch our conversation with Mr. Bielema to find out more details about who is impacted by the new rule, what you need to do to become OSHA compliant, and how to best protect your employees.

Need to update your silica training? Call the safety experts at SCT at 1-800-204-1729, or contact us through our online contact page!

OSHA Looking to Postpone Crane Operator Requirements

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) wants to extend the deadline for crane operator certification that is scheduled to go into effect in November of this year.

In Sept. 2014, OSHA issued a final rule that set the crane operator requirement deadline for November 2017. OSHA’s new proposed rule would push back the deadline to Nov. 10, 2018. According to OSHA’s press release, the additional time is to “address stakeholder concerns.”

OSHA’s Cranes and Derricks in Construction standard lays out four options for crane operators to become certified:

  • Certification by an independent testing organization accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting organization
  • Qualification by an employer’s independently audited program
  • Qualification by the U.S. military
  • Compliance with qualifying state or local licensing requirements

Those wanting to comment on the deadline delay can do so online at http://www.regulations.gov , by fax to the OSHA Docket Office at (202) 693–1648, or by mail to OSHA Docket Office, RIN No. 1218–AC86, Technical Data Center, Room N–3508, OSHA, U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20210.

Comments must be submitted by Sept. 29, 2017.

For all of your occupational safety and health needs, contact the experts at SCT by calling 1-800-204-1729.

SCT hires EHS executive to grow domestic, international presence

Middleburg Heights, Ohio – After expanding its Midwest presence with a Chicago office earlier this year, Safety Controls Technology, Inc. (SCT) is branching out to the East Coast.

SCT is proud to welcome James Joyce as Senior Vice President of Global EHS Services. He will be based out of Boston, Massachusetts, but will be enhancing SCT’s services both domestically and internationally. Mr. Joyce will add his unique and dynamic skill set to SCT’s already strong leadership team to assist in business planning, training and developing the skills of SCT employees.

“Jim adds a global, corporate perspective to our company that we really need with our business expansions,” said Rob Medlock, SCT Senior Vice President of General Industry. “We are all looking forward to benefitting from his knowledge and ability to interact with business at any level.”

Mr. Joyce brings decades of occupational and environmental health experience to the team at SCT, including years leading Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) teams for multi-billion dollar businesses.

“I view this as a new, different, and exciting challenge,” Mr. Joyce said. “I’m really passionate about workplace safety and environmental compliance. I’m here to help SCT and our customers in any way I can.”

Most recently, Mr. Joyce served as the Vice President of Global Environment, Health and Safety for Owens-Illinois Global, a $7.5 billion enterprise and a Fortune 500 Company. In that role, Mr. Joyce developed the global EHS leadership team that covered 27,000 employees at 79 factories in 24 countries. His business acumen and leadership led to a reduction of all major measurable safety indicators.

“Jim brings a wealth of international safety and health experience to the table and I look forward to seeing the new opportunities that it will create for our company,” said SCT Vice President of Safety Engineering Services Nick Walters.

Mr. Joyce grew up in Youngstown, Ohio, surrounded by the steel and manufacturing industries that define the region. Manufacturing and industry have been in his blood for generations—his grandfathers worked in the steel and railroad industries and his father worked at General Motors.

From 1976 to 1986, Mr. Joyce worked his way up the ranks at Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel, eventually becoming the general foreman of operations. Mr. Joyce then worked at Bayer Corp. for more than two decades starting in 1986, beginning in technical sales, product management, and mergers and acquisitions.

His transition to EHS began in 1993, when a fire and explosion at one of the company’s newly acquired plants in Boston injured several fire fighters. Following the incident, Mr. Joyce was promoted to lead the plant’s renewed focus on EHS.

“I discovered I really liked the work,” Mr. Joyce said. “It was almost as if EHS found me.”

He developed and implemented a new safety response system that involved employees at all levels. His efforts and safety measures worked. Injuries and other safety-related recordables decreased, and workers at the plant enjoyed a safer and healthier workplace.

“This was an opportunity to fix something that was broken,” Mr. Joyce said.

The system was such a success that he was selected to be Bayer’s Global Director of EHS, and led the new safety response system’s implementation at nine more factories in the U.S., England, Germany and China, where employee health and safety also greatly increased.

In 2012, Mr. Joyce worked independently as an EHS consultant for Norit Americas, Inc. and Owens-Illinois, before joining O-I full time.

SCT is a Woman-Owned Business Enterprise (WBE) delivering comprehensive occupational safety and health solutions to both the public and private sectors. SCT’s mission is to provide clients with reliable and responsible services that will save costs and create efficiencies without compromising environmental, occupational, and engineering quality.

For all occupational safety & health needs, contact the experts at SCT at 1-800-204-1729.

Healthcare Workers at High Risk for Sprains and Strains

Today we’re finishing up our Safety Hurdles in Healthcare video series with a look at one of the most common workplace injuries: sprains and strains.

Handling and moving patients is by far the biggest cause of musculoskeletal disorders in the healthcare field. Back injuries alone cost the healthcare industry about $20 billion each year. Take a look at our new video below for some great ways to avoid these costly injuries.

Remember, you can keep up with our videos by following us on our various social media pages: Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, or Twitter.

If you’re ready to dive in and get the best workplace safety experts on your team, contact us today online or give us a call at 1-800-204-1729.

 

SCT gains IDEM approval for Asbestos Training

SCT now adds a new endorsement under its belt: approval for asbestos training by the Indiana Department of Environmental Management. Classes approved include the initial and refresher Asbestos Awareness Training courses for both asbestos workers and asbestos supervisors.

IDEM’s asbestos program is accredited by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which is something Ohio’s program does not have. The Ohio Department of Health does offer reciprocity for training programs approved by a USEPA accredited state. SCT is in the process of working on and anticipates gaining Ohio approval in the coming weeks.

Subsequently, SCT will work on obtaining reciprocity recognition or additional approval in states where it conducts regular business, including, but not limited to: California, Illinois, Texas, New York, and New Jersey.

Why do workers need Asbestos Awareness Training?

Workers who will be potentially exposed to asbestos-containing materials (ACM) are required to have training on handling, removing, and disposing of said materials. Workers must also receive training on all necessary personal protective equipment designed to protect them while working with ACM.

As we profiled back in October, which is “Healthy Lung Month,” exposure to asbestos is one of the two most common causes of lung problems amongst American workers. Asbestos exposure can lead to lung cancer, asbestosis, and other severe and chronic respiratory ailments. Symptoms and diseases caused by asbestos exposure may take many years to develop after exposure.

For all your occupational safety and health needs, contact the experts at SCT at 800-204-1729 or through our website contact form.

Staying Safe while Working in Extreme Heat

As we approach the warm summer months here in the United States, millions of workers will have to battle the sun and heat while working outdoors.

If an employee or coworker succumbed to a heat-related illness such as heat stroke, would you know what to do? Watch our video for some helpful tips that could save a life.

To ensure your workers, both indoor and out, are prepared for all of the safety challenges that the workplace can bring, contact the experts at SCT.

National Forklift Safety Day

Not only does this week mark the first ever OSHA-sponsored Safe and Sound Week, but today, June 13, 2017, is also National Forklift Safety Day.

Each year, about forklift incidents result in about 61,800 non-serious injuries, 34,900 serious injuries, and 85 fatalities, according to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). About 42% of those accidents are people being crushed by a vehicle tipping over, and another 25% are people being crushed between vehicle and surface.

On National Forklift Safety Day, many groups including the Industrial Truck Association, are working to get the word out on the importance of proper forklift safety practices, especially the need for effective operator training. The ITA also meets with government officials on National Forklift Safety Day to discuss what lawmakers can do to help improve forklift safety nationwide.

Forklift Safety Tips

While a training course is needed to properly educate a forklift operator, here are some helpful tips to remember the next time you get behind the controls of a forklift according to OSHA:

  • Inspect the forklift for damage before each use, and if damage is found, report it to a supervisor
  • Know the load limit of your vehicle
  • Honk your horn at all cross aisles to help avoid collisions with pedestrians
  • Always look in the direction of travel. If the load blocks your view, travel in reverse
  • To avoid tipover, never turn while on a grade
  • Do not travel with the load elevated

Do you or your employees need forklift safety training? At SCT, we offer a handful of classes covering numerous powered industrial trucks, including forklifts. Contact us today by calling 1-800-204-1729 or by filling out our online form.

New Videos Cover Outdoor Working Hazards

As the weather warms up and summer approaches, millions of workers will head outside. While working outdoors has its benefits, a number of working hazards also come along with it.

In the first video of our series, learn the different types of outdoor working hazards including physical hazards, biological hazards, and vector-borne diseases.

Need workplace safety training? Does your worksite need a gap analysis?

Whether indoors or outside, the experts at SCT can ensure that your company and employees have the knowledge they need to be OSHA compliant.

Also be sure to visit SCT Supply, where we offer thousands of high quality safety products at great prices. Check out a few our outdoor working safety products below.